Thursday, June 17, 2010

Big Game Fish

The sport of fishing as recreation is a fairly recent phenomenon although ideas of fishing and the philosophy of fishing have been around for nearly 5 centuries. When we speak of big game fish, all that we mean by this expression is that category of fish that are not the run of the mill, ordinary fish that you would find sitting on the cold shelves of the supermarket. Big game fish are actually the exotic, wild fish residing in lakes, rivers and oceans. Any number of fish comes under this category, just to name a few we would mention walleye, salmon, pike, trout and bass in freshwater and sailfish, marlin, bonefish, tarpon and tuna in saltwater. According to the laws of the United States government, there are certain rules regarding recreational or big game fishing. Every state has laws about the season in which particular fish may be fished, also to remember are that the guidelines detail carefully the species of fish, the minimum permissible size and the number of fish that can be taken.

All these rules and guidelines of Big game fish are extremely important and must be followed thoroughly in order to maintain an ecological balance in the freshwater and saltwater fishing areas. There are basically two methods of recreational fishing, one is bait casting, and the other is fly-casting. Fly-casting requires a light rod and reels to ensure that the fish reel in without applying too much force. This technique is used to catch fish that inhabit running waters like trout and salmon. The bait used to lure these fish is usually live worms, or insects.

Another method of catching the big game fish is the bait catching method, where the rod and reels have to be sturdy to sustain the weight of the fish and also not yield to the pressure exerted by the fish. The bait, which is a very important aspect of big game fish, can range from live subjects to colorful spinning baits, spoons or artificial plugs that can be brought to rest at the bottom of the water or on the side of the boat or can also be trailed behind the boat. The bait catching method is generally more successful in lakes and large rivers.

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